Skylighting: sub-query searching

I was using a press release text from the company of a student recently. He was drawn immediately to two items – We raise the bar every year to remain contemporary; the high standards that we hold ourselves to in our people practices.

We did a bit of work on the use of these two items in the text.

After the session I was thinking that it would have been good for the student to have been able to see other examples of use of the language he had pointed out. That is although the language in the press release was authentic to what extent was it typical and so possibly worth learning by the student?

Skylight offers a sub-query search feature which allows one to see collocating words that can appear with several intervening words and in any position.

For example does the phrase raise the bar always appear in this form or are there other versions?

Enter bar into the search (with corpus selection of ukWaC):

Enter initial search term (bar)
Enter initial search term (bar)

You will get a result screen such as:

Result screen from initial search (bar)
Result screen from initial search (bar)

then enter raise and you will get results such as:

Result screen from second term (raise)
Result screen from second term (raise)

The results show that yes raise the bar is most common form, there are some uses (which can be found through the sort feature) where an adjective such as quality or performance is placed in-between. i.e. raise the quality bar”; raise the performance bar”. An interesting use is with a film that manages to raise an emotional bar.

One could then further filter results by looking for instances of standard or standards (use the | pipe command as an OR operator i.e. standard|standards) and we get uses such as “set up new standards that raise the emissions bar extremely high”

Turning now to we hold ourselves to

first plug in hold
then to
then ourselves|myself|himself|herself|themselves
and then finally standard|standards.

We get such variations as:

“People hold footballers to standards that they wouldn’t dream of
“can law schools hold themselves accountable to other people’s standards”
“Schools that hold parents to account, and that are themselves accountable
“For university law schools to hold themselves accountable to externally generated criteria”

As to what extent a student like mine who was interested in human resources/training issues would be as interested in such sentences is worth asking and exploring. Since the ukWaC corpus samples general web texts we can assume some example uses would interest our learner.

The key import is that this method allows a way to quickly extend a text without relying on one’s wits in the class.

Thanks for reading.