#TESOL2017 – Corpus related talks and posters

While IATEFL2017 may well have the razzledazzle, TESOL2017 is the big kahuna. Find below corpus related talks and posters (program pdf). There are some well known names here – Kiyomi Chujo, Randi Reppen, Diane Schmitt, Dilin Liu, Keith Folse.

Do TESOL record talks like IATEFL? Otherwise am putting faith in some tweeters to get inkling of what goes down. You know what to do folks.

Tuesday 21 March
Developing Academic Discourse Competence Through Formulaic Sequences
Content Area: Vocabulary/Lexicon
The Academic Formulas List and Phrasal Expressions List include formulaic sequences that build on traditional lists, such as the Academic Word List, to better meet student proficiency needs at the discourse level. Participants investigate the lists; experience collaborative activities designed to assist students in acquisition, including online and corpus-based; and discuss considerations for adaptation and implementation. Step-by-step guides provided.
Alissa Nostas, Arizona State University, USA
Mariah Fairley, American University in Cairo, Egypt
Susanne Rizzo, American University in Cairo, USA

Wednesday 22 March
Engaging Students in Making Grammar Choices: An In‑Depth Approach
Content Area: Grammar
Appropriate use of grammar structures in academic writing can be a challenge even for advanced ESL writers. Drawing on corpus research on the characteristics of written discourse, the presenters demonstrate how to engage students in making effective grammar choices to improve their academic writing. Sample instructional materials are provided.
Wendy Wang, Eastern Michigan University, USA
Susan Ruellan, Eastern Michigan University, USA

Lexical Bundles in L1 and L2 University Student Argumentative Essays
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition
This presentation reports findings of a corpus-based analysis of the use, overuse, and misuse of lexical bundles in L2 university student argumentative essays. The presentation also provides ways ESL composition instructors can assist learners in using lexical bundles more appropriately.
Tetyana Bychkovska, Ohio University, USA

Teachers’ U.S. Corpus
Content Area: Research/Research Methodology
The presenters amassed a linguistic corpus-TUSC-representing approximately 4 million words based on over 50 K–12 content area textbooks. Findings of the corpus, including word lists representative of academic language, are offered. Participants are invited to discuss ways this corpus may assist K–12 teachers, especially teachers of ELLs.
Seyedjafar Ehsanzadehsorati, Florida International University, USA

And Furthermore
Content Area: Discourse and Pragmatics
Advanced learner materials offer few guidelines for the use of the expressions “moreover,” “furthermore,” “in fact,” “likewise,” “in turn,” and other additive connectors. Grounded in pragmatic theory and drawing on written corpus examples and experimental speaker judgement data, this talk defines optimal uses and paves a path to enlightened class instruction.
Howard Williams, Teachers College, Columbia University, USA

Teacher Electronic Feedback in ESL Writing Course Chats
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition
This corpus-based study analyzes the rhetorical moves, uptake, and student perceptions of the teacher-student chats from five freshman ESL writing courses taught by three expert teachers. Findings show that chats are useful for establishing rapport and clarifying feedback, but we suggest that longer chat sessions may be more effective.
Estela Ene, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, USA
Thomas Upton, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, USA

Using Corpus Linguistics in Teaching ESL Writing
Content Area: Applied Linguistics
This session explores the use of corpus linguistics in teaching L2 writing as an effective way to bring authentic language into the classroom. The presenters discuss ways of incorporating corpora in teaching L2 writing and demonstrate a sample activity of how to use a corpus to address discourse competence.
Gusztav Demeter, Case Western Reserve University, USA
Ana Codita, Case Western Reserve Universtiy, USA
Hee-Seung Kang, Case Western Reserve University, USA

How Technology Shapes Our Language and Feedback: Mode Matters
Content Area: Applied Linguistics
This presentation explores how the use of evaluative language differs between parallel corpora of text and screencast feedback and what this means for the role of feedback and position of instructor. In understanding the implications of technology choices, instructors can better match tools to their pedagogical purposes
Kelly Cunningham, Iowa State University, USA

Posters
An Effective Bilingual Sentence Corpus for Low-Proficiency EFL Learners
Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/
Technology in Education
Kiyomi Chujo, Nihon University, Japan

Propositional Precision in Learner Corpora: Turkish and Greek EFL Learners
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language
Jülide Inözü, Cukurova University, Turkey
Cem Can, Cukurova University, Turkey

Thursday 23 March
Corpus‑Based Learning of Reporting Verbs in L2 Academic Writing
Content Area: Higher Education
We present findings from our study on the effectiveness of corpus based learning of reporting verbs during a multidraft literature review assignment. The results suggest corpus-based instruction can improve L2 students’ genre awareness and lexical variety without time consuming training. Participants receive sample corpus-based teaching
materials used in the revision workshop.
Ji-young Shin, Purdue University, USA
R. Scott Partridge, Purdue University, USA
Ashley J. Velázquez, Purdue University, USA
Aleksandra Swatek, Purdue University, USA
Shelley Staples, University of Arizona, USA

Providing EAP Listening Input: An Evaluation of Recorded Listening Passages
Content Area: Listening, Speaking/Speech
Are the recorded passages that accompany listening textbooks providing students with exposure to all the necessary elements of academic lecture language? The presenter shares results of a corpusbased study, illustrating what recorded passages do well, where they fall short, and providing activities designed to supplement EAP listening instruction.
Erin Schnur, Northern Arizona University, USA

Developing Learner Resources Using Corpus Linguistics
Randi Reppen, Northern Arizona University, USA

Applying Research Findings to L2 Writing Instruction
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition
Effective pedagogical practices have a strong research base and respond directly to students’ learning needs. Presenters share materials developed for such needs in EAP writing classrooms, drawing on grammar/vocabulary corpus research, integration of CBI principles with current L2 writing approaches, and research findings regarding assignment sequencing for larger end-products.
Margi Wald, UC Berkeley, USA
Jan Frodesen, UC Santa Barbara, USA
Diane Schmitt, Nottingham Trent University, United Kingdom (Great Britain)
Gena Bennett, Independent, USA

Teaching Students Self‑Editing in Writing With Interactive Online Corpus Tool
Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/
Technology in Education
L2 academic writers often struggle with word choice and collocates when composing in academic English. In this teaching tip, the presenter uses http://www.wordandphrase.info, a free corpus-based online interactive tool, to show how to teach self-editing strategies to L2 writers and demonstrates activities that can be incorporated into EAP writing courses.
Aleksandra Swatek, Purdue University, USA

Corpus 101: Navigating the Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA)
Content Area: Vocabulary/Lexicon
The Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA) may look overwhelming at first, but it is in fact an easy-to-use resource. Presenters guide participants through step-by-step navigation of this valuable tool, sharing tips and ideas for teachers and tasks for students that relate to several of COCA’s search and analysis functions.
Heather Gregg Zitlau, Georgetown University, USA
Heather Weger, Georgetown University, USA
Kelly Hill Zirker, Diplomatic Language Services, USA

Using a Medical Research Corpus to Teach ESP Students
Content Area: English for Specific Purposes
The study discussed investigated how expert writers use lexical bundles in medical research articles. More than 200 bundles were identified using a corpus of more than 1 million words. A structural and functional analysis revealed patterns that can be used in developing materials for medical students in international ESP classes.
Ndeye Bineta Mbodj, Health Department Thies University, Senegal

Using Corpora for Engaging Language Teaching: Effective Techniques and Activities
Using concrete examples from their new book published by TESOL, the presenters introduce some common useful procedures and activities for using corpora to teach various aspects of English, including vocabulary, grammar, and writing. They also explain how to develop and use corpora to assess learner language and develop teaching materials.
Dilin Liu, University of Alabama, USA
Lei Lei, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China

Flexible, Free, and Open Data‑Driven Learning for the Masses
Content Area: Media (Print, Broadcast, Video, and Digital)
This presentation shares findings from multisite research with the open-source FLAX (Flexible Language Acquisition) project. Open digital collections used in formal classroom-based language education and in non-formal online education (MOOCs) are presented to demonstrate how openly licensed linguistic content using data-driven methods can support learning, teaching, and materials development.
Alannah Fitzgerald, Concordia University, USA

Posters
Visualizing Vocabulary Across Cultures: Web Images as a Corpus
Content Area: Vocabulary/Lexicon
Cameron Romney, Doshisha University, Japan
John Campbell-Larsen, Kyoto Women’s University, Japan

Developing Autonomous Academic Writing Competence Through Corpus Linguistics
Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/
Technology in Education
Chinger Zapata, Universidad Católica del Norte, Chile
Hugo Keith

Data-Driven Learning (DDL) for Teaching Vocabulary and Grammar
Content Area: Teaching Methodology and Strategy
Pramod Sah, University of British Columbia, Canada
Anu Upadhaya, Tribhuvan University, Nepal

Friday 24 March
16 Keys to Teaching ESL Grammar and Vocabulary
Content Area: Grammar
This session uses corpus linguistics data to examine not only which grammar points should be taught but which vocabulary should be taught with each key grammar point. Sample lessons for teaching vocabulary with grammar and tips for designing and teaching these activities are presented.
Keith Folse, University of Central Florida, USA

Beyond Word Lists: Approaching Verbal Complements Lexicogrammatically and Cognitively
Content Area: Grammar
Gerund and infinitive verbal complements are often taught back-to-back via the use of memorization and word lists. This presentation suggests varying lesson placement, approaching the subject from a position of conceptualization of components drawn from Conti’s rule, and incorporating corpus data in classroom materials to improve salience thereof.
Miranda Hartley, University of Alabama, USA

Corpus‑Based Comparison Between Two Lists of Academic English Words
Content Area: Vocabulary/Lexicon
The study discussed compares Coxhead’s Academic Word List and Gardner and Davies’ Academic Vocabulary List in an independently developed 72-million-token university academic corpus to reveal which list is more suitable for academic vocabulary education across different academic disciplines to improve the effectiveness of English‑medium instruction.
Huamin Qi, Western University, Canada

Fostering Effective Participation in L1 Discourse Communities Through Formulaic Sequences
Content Area: Vocabulary/Lexicon
While vocabulary lists contribute substantially to lexical knowledge, discourse-level proficiency remains a challenge. The Academic Formulas List and Phrasal Expressions List, sets of formulaic sequences, address this challenge, helping learners participate more effectively in L1 discourse communities. Facilitators share online and corpus-based activities for formulaic sequence acquisition.
Susanne Rizzo, American University in Cairo, Egypt
Alissa Nostas, Arizona State University, USA
Mariah Fairley, American University in Cairo, Egypt

Developing an Open Educational Resources EAP Corpus
Content Area: English for Specific Purposes
This presentation focuses on the development of an open educational resources EAP corpus. Presenters demonstrate how the corpus can be accessed and downloaded, reused in a variety of ways, revised, remixed, and redistributed to other interested teachers, researchers, and/or students.
Brent Green, Salt Lake Community College, USA
Dean Huber, Salt Lake Community College, USA
George Ellington, Salt Lake Community College, USA

The Emergence of Academic Language Among Advanced Learners
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition
This session addresses the gradual changes of academic language based on a pilot study of 35 students over a 16-week graduate course. Suggestions and practical activities, informed by these findings, are demonstrated, including academic discourse techniques and the use of corpora and other online tools for text analysis.
Cheryl Zimmerman, California State University, Fullerton, USA
Jun Li, California State University, Fullerton, USA

Advertisements